Venice Biennale 2012 A central part of the project is a belfry. We have proposed to replace the traditional metal bell with one made out of wood. This refers to the central European tradition where wooden bells replaced cast metal church bells, before the Easter celebrations: In respect for – and in memory of their lost ones. As part of the Venice Architectural Biennale 2012, the wooden bell was exhibited for the first time in Sverre Fehns beautiful pavilion.  

Venice Biennale 2012

A central part of the project is a belfry. We have proposed to replace the traditional metal bell with one made out of wood. This refers to the central European tradition where wooden bells replaced cast metal church bells, before the Easter celebrations: In respect for – and in memory of their lost ones.

As part of the Venice Architectural Biennale 2012, the wooden bell was exhibited for the first time in Sverre Fehns beautiful pavilion.

 

With Fantastic Norway

 

Cardboard Cloud The installation “Cardboard Cloud” was designed on behalf of the Norwegian Center for Design and Architecture (DogA), in Oslo. The goal for installation was to create a framework around the exhibition of new Norwegian design objects. We therefore based the installation on the packaging of these products. The result was a “cloud” made by 3000 cardboard boxes, creating a variety of different spatial units within the 350 m2 large hall. All of the boxes were recycled at the end of the exhibition.  

Cardboard Cloud

The installation “Cardboard Cloud” was designed on behalf of the Norwegian Center for Design and Architecture (DogA), in Oslo. The goal for installation was to create a framework around the exhibition of new Norwegian design objects.

We therefore based the installation on the packaging of these products. The result was a “cloud” made by 3000 cardboard boxes, creating a variety of different spatial units within the 350 m2 large hall. All of the boxes were recycled at the end of the exhibition.

 

Venice Biennale 2010 Together with a series of young nordic designers, Fantastic Norway was invited to participate in the exhibition “At Work With” at the 2010 Venice Biennale. We were asked to contribute with one week of work where the studio move into (“At Work With”) the Nordic Pavillion. The concept behind the exhibition series was to exhibit how young designers are working, rather than representations of architectural projects. In the invited period Fantastic Norway worked with and developed a project affiliated with the camping culture in Norway. During the week we developed a series of new prototypes of the “spikerteltetet” (a permanent housing extension of a caravan) that could attract new user groups and new meaning to camping culture, while existing values are retained and taken seriously. Fantastic Norway’s contribution contained elements of sociological analysis, interaction, innovation, challenge, chance, meetings, workshops, waffles, objects, dreams and surprises. TEAM: Haakon Matre Aasarød, Erlend Blakstad Haffner, Ingeborg Cappelen Lindheim, Anette C. Flygansvær, Alex Berg & Antoine Fichaux.  

Venice Biennale 2010

Together with a series of young nordic designers, Fantastic Norway was invited to participate in the exhibition “At Work With” at the 2010 Venice Biennale.

We were asked to contribute with one week of work where the studio move into (“At Work With”) the Nordic Pavillion. The concept behind the exhibition series was to exhibit how young designers are working, rather than representations of architectural projects.

In the invited period Fantastic Norway worked with and developed a project affiliated with the camping culture in Norway. During the week we developed a series of new prototypes of the “spikerteltetet” (a permanent housing extension of a caravan) that could attract new user groups and new meaning to camping culture, while existing values are retained and taken seriously.

Fantastic Norway’s contribution contained elements of sociological analysis, interaction, innovation, challenge, chance, meetings, workshops, waffles, objects, dreams and surprises.

TEAM: Haakon Matre Aasarød, Erlend Blakstad Haffner, Ingeborg Cappelen Lindheim, Anette C. Flygansvær, Alex Berg & Antoine Fichaux.

 

Slide City / Per Kartvedt In the 70’s Oslo’s own “Man in Black”, Professor of Architecture Per Kartvedt , started his long lasting lecture series on cities, communities, myths and dreams. Per has since then been an influential character in contemporary architecture, both as principle of the architecture department at the University of Strathclyde and as teacher and supervisor on several different architecture schools in Europe. For a decade the slides from the lectures remained tucked away in an attic in Nesodden. Now the slides are projected once again in Slide City at Internasjonalen in Oslo. Slide City is an installation consisting of small high-rises, lit from the inside, with 2000 of Per’s legendary slides as windows. The windows are disjointed pieces of Per’s stories and ideas. Each window is a fragment of his life, thoughts and stories, not unlike the fragments we see of other people’s life every day through windows and brief meetings. Fragments you put together into new stories and fictions. The exhibition is designed by Fantastic Norway in close collaboration with Per Kartvedt. Team: Lars Goossens (project manager), Per Kartvedt, Håkon Matre Aasarød, Erlend Blakstad Haffner, Monika Steiger, Ida Sandvik, Emilie Westergaard Folkersen, Ingeborg Cappelen Lindheim and Linn Rafdal.  

Slide City / Per Kartvedt

In the 70’s Oslo’s own “Man in Black”, Professor of Architecture Per Kartvedt , started his long lasting lecture series on cities, communities, myths and dreams. Per has since then been an influential character in contemporary architecture, both as principle of the architecture department at the University of Strathclyde and as teacher and supervisor on several different architecture schools in Europe.

For a decade the slides from the lectures remained tucked away in an attic in Nesodden. Now the slides are projected once again in Slide City at Internasjonalen in Oslo.

Slide City is an installation consisting of small high-rises, lit from the inside, with 2000 of Per’s legendary slides as windows.

The windows are disjointed pieces of Per’s stories and ideas. Each window is a fragment of his life, thoughts and stories, not unlike the fragments we see of other people’s life every day through windows and brief meetings. Fragments you put together into new stories and fictions.

The exhibition is designed by Fantastic Norway in close collaboration with Per Kartvedt.

Team: Lars Goossens (project manager), Per Kartvedt, Håkon Matre Aasarød, Erlend Blakstad Haffner, Monika Steiger, Ida Sandvik, Emilie Westergaard Folkersen, Ingeborg Cappelen Lindheim and Linn Rafdal.

 

Eurovisions Fantastic Norway AS conducted the part as curator, architect, graphic artist and producer for the exhibition “Eurovisions”, at the Norwegian center for Design and Architecture in Oslo (December 2009). The exhibition presented three different districts in Trondheim, Oslo and Vardø, and communicated the various challenges these cities face today. In addition the exhibition was to display a number of alternative future scenarios for these cities, conducted by young architects in the international architectural competition Europan. The exhibition consisted mainly of 2 parts: one media zone in which we, in collaboration with NRK Troms, produced fictional TV news that conveyed the various future scenarios. The second part was a large installation with silhouettes of the various towns that as a whole appeared as the “purple summit” in the great hall. The different competition entries were displayed on the back of these silhouettes.  

Eurovisions

Fantastic Norway AS conducted the part as curator, architect, graphic artist and producer for the exhibition “Eurovisions”, at the Norwegian center for Design and Architecture in Oslo (December 2009).

The exhibition presented three different districts in Trondheim, Oslo and Vardø, and communicated the various challenges these cities face today. In addition the exhibition was to display a number of alternative future scenarios for these cities, conducted by young architects in the international architectural competition Europan.

The exhibition consisted mainly of 2 parts: one media zone in which we, in collaboration with NRK Troms, produced fictional TV news that conveyed the various future scenarios. The second part was a large installation with silhouettes of the various towns that as a whole appeared as the “purple summit” in the great hall. The different competition entries were displayed on the back of these silhouettes.

 

100% Norway Fantastic Norway was recently awarded second place for best stand design at 100% Design in Earls Court / London, by Blueprint Magazine. The jury stated: “Within the context of the exhibition’s opening debate, surrounding ideas of the post-national nature of design, a country which has attempted to capture some essence and the characteristics of Norwegian design is an interesting exploration, and one which the Blueprint judges deemed worthy of special commendation”. Our design was not mainly a stand for 100% Norway, but first and foremost a flexible exhibition system that has the ability to adapt into different spaces: From small and narrow areas to larger halls and spaces. The stand design consists of a series of triangles and squares and it employs aluminium poles and a wooden puzzle like floor. Our aim was to not make a retrospective and romantic stand, but rather create system with modern materials. Our focus is that Norway should be promoted as a modern and hi-tech society. Throughout history our coastal culture has always had the ability to absorb new ideas, and has been adaptable during changing times. Therefore, Norwegians have in one way always been really modern. The design and production was led by Lars Goossens (Fantastic Norway), in close colaboration with Bjørnar Gudbrandsen (NSI).  

100% Norway

Fantastic Norway was recently awarded second place for best stand design at 100% Design in Earls Court / London, by Blueprint Magazine. The jury stated: “Within the context of the exhibition’s opening debate, surrounding ideas of the post-national nature of design, a country which has attempted to capture some essence and the characteristics of Norwegian design is an interesting exploration, and one which the Blueprint judges deemed worthy of special commendation”.

Our design was not mainly a stand for 100% Norway, but first and foremost a flexible exhibition system that has the ability to adapt into different spaces: From small and narrow areas to larger halls and spaces.

The stand design consists of a series of triangles and squares and it employs aluminium poles and a wooden puzzle like floor. Our aim was to not make a retrospective and romantic stand, but rather create system with modern materials.

Our focus is that Norway should be promoted as a modern and hi-tech society. Throughout history our coastal culture has always had the ability to absorb new ideas, and has been adaptable during changing times. Therefore, Norwegians have in one way always been really modern.

The design and production was led by Lars Goossens (Fantastic Norway), in close colaboration with Bjørnar Gudbrandsen (NSI).

 

Oslo Triennale We were invited to give our take on the notion of ”risk” in Norwegian culture, which was the main theme at the Oslo Triennale 2007. In addition to an essay, we made a physical model and a short movie / slide show as a response to the challenge.

Oslo Triennale

We were invited to give our take on the notion of ”risk” in Norwegian culture, which was the main theme at the Oslo Triennale 2007. In addition to an essay, we made a physical model and a short movie / slide show as a response to the challenge.

High Tide Fire Sitting next to a fireplace at night, staring into the flames is a wonderful feeling. So is sitting on a peer dangle your feet over the water. What if you combine these two? The High Tide Fire installation was done at Trondheim waterfront, together with architect students from NTNU, with ambition of creating a new recreational area at the peer. 15 steel frames were connected to the excisting peer. 15 steel baskets were filled with dry wood and then connected to the frames. When the sun set and the high tide came, the fireplaces were lit. While burning the sparks hit the water surface with a fizzeling sound, and created a calm and strange meeting place at the seaside of Trondheim.

High Tide Fire

Sitting next to a fireplace at night, staring into the flames is a wonderful feeling. So is sitting on a peer dangle your feet over the water. What if you combine these two?

The High Tide Fire installation was done at Trondheim waterfront, together with architect students from NTNU, with ambition of creating a new recreational area at the peer.

15 steel frames were connected to the excisting peer. 15 steel baskets were filled with dry wood and then connected to the frames. When the sun set and the high tide came, the fireplaces were lit.

While burning the sparks hit the water surface with a fizzeling sound, and created a calm and strange meeting place at the seaside of Trondheim.